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Interview with Michael Hartney, Hoover Institution, on education and the teachers union
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Interview with Michael Hartney, Hoover Institution, on education and the teachers union

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Some 70% of teachers are part of a teachers union. Most likely, they’re part of the NEA (National Education Association) or AFT (American Federation of Teachers). That means our kids and their education are beholden to what is essentially an interest group supported by our government. But the interests of the unions don't appear to be aligned with many parents. For instance, NEA President Becky Pringle, at a recent speech in Florida, roused the audience with a preacher-like sermon on standing up for the truth against persecution. That truth to her is that abortion is a right and that sex isn't binary, and that kids should be taught pornography in elementary school. If these sounds like value systems that don't fall along the lines of academic courses, like you know - math and reading - it's because these are value systems and not academic courses. 

So much for the separation of church and state. In my interview with Michael Hartney, who's studied unions and their hold on education, we talk about the following:
- How teachers unions got so powerful.
- Why Catholic Schools perform better than public schools.
- How government essentially subsidizes unions.
- How the pluralistic value systems of public schools caused many to lose the attraction of parochial schools, which is a value system grounded in respect, community, honor and acknowledgement of a higher being. 
- As a way to compete against emerging schools, the teachers unions are trying to stand for a mission. Unfortunately, that mission is something many parents don't like or want. 

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We Over Me
Weoverme
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